Street names in Côte Saint-Luc

This page lists the history of street names in Côte Saint-Luc, including the former name of the street and the date homes were first constructed there. Some street names require more research and this page will be updated as new information emerges.

Thank you to the staff of the Eleanor London Côte Saint-Luc Public Library for the many hours of research to compile this list.

Abraham De Sola Avenue

The street is named for Abraham De Sola, a Canadian Orthodox rabbi, author, scientist and orientalist. De Sola was born on September 18, 1825 in London, England. In 1847, he came to Montreal and was elected minister of the Shearith Israel congregation on St. Kevin St. in Snowdon. A year later he was appointed lecturer, and in 1853 he became professor of Hebrew and oriental literature at McGill University. He eventually became senior professor of the faculty of arts. He received a doctorate in law in 1858 from McGill. De Sola visited the United States frequently and was soon recognized as one of the most powerful leaders of Orthodoxy. He died on June 5, 1882 in New York City and was buried in Montreal.

  • First home constructed: TBD

Adalbert Avenue

This street is named for J. Adalbert Paris, who was mayor of Côte Saint-Luc from May 13, 1953 to May 9, 1963.

  • First home constructed: 1954

Aldrin Avenue

The street is named for American astronaut Edwin Eugene "Buzz" Aldrin, who was the second person to step on the Moon’s surface on July 20, 1969. He was born in Montclair, New Jersey on January 20, 1930. He graduated from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, New York in 1951 and became an Air Force officer. In 1963, he received a doctor’s degree in astronautics from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Aldrin was also the pilot of Gemini 12 in 1966, where he exited the spacecraft and walked in space for five-and-a-half hours. He resigned from the astronaut program in 1971 and then retired a year later from the Air Force.

  • Previous name: Brandeis Avenue
  • Date of name change: October 6, 1969
  • First home constructed: 1982

Alpine Avenue

  • Previous name: Fyon Avenue
  • Date of name change: July 18, 1956
  • First home constructed: 1954

Armstrong Avenue

The street is named for the American astronaut Neil Armstrong, who was the first person to step on the Moon’s surface on July 20, 1969. Armstrong was born in Wapakoneta, Ohio on August 5, 1930. He graduated from Purdue University and was a Navy pilot from 1949 to 1952. Before becoming an astronaut in 1962, he was a civilian test pilot. Among the many awards he received, the Presidential Medal of Freedom was presented to him in 1969. He resigned from the astronaut program in 1970 but worked for NASA until 1971. Between 1971 and 1979, Armstrong was an aerospace engineering professor at the University of Cincinnati.

  • Previous name: John Keats Avenue
  • Date of name change: October 6, 1969
  • First home constructed: 1980

Ashkelon Crescent

This street is named for the city of Ashkelon, Israel. The city is a seaport in the southern coastal plain of Israel, located north of Gaza and south of Ashod. The name comes from the root shkl, which means "to weigh", perhaps indicating a commercial or financial centre. The city has been in existence since the ancient period. Ashkelon is also a twin city of Côte Saint-Luc. Ashkelon Gardens is also named in honour of Ashkelon, Israel.

  • First home constructed: 1985

Baily Road

This is named for Francis Warren Baily, who was a city councillor in Côte Saint-Luc from 1953 to 1960.

  • Previous name: Regent (Cad 82)
  • Date of name change: July 21, 1954
  • First home constructed: 1956

Banting Road

This street is named for Dr. Frederick Grant Banting, the Canadian physician who discovered insulin. Banting was born in Alliston, Ontario on November 14, 1891. In 1921, Banting and Dr. Charles Best were able to obtain an extract for insulin. This research lead to an effective way of treating diabetes. In 1923, Banting became head of the University of Toronto in 1923 and was the co-recipient of the Nobel Prize for Physiology. He was made a knight of the British Empire in 1934. On February 21, 1941, Banting died in an air disaster in Newfoundland during the Second World War.

  • First home constructed: 1966

Beethoven Avenue

This street is named for the famous German composer Ludwig Van Beethoven. He was born in Bonn, Germany on December 16, 1770. Beethoven's talent was recognized at a very early age, and by 1778 he was studying the organ and viola in addition to the piano. He was taught by great composers, such as Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and Joseph Haydn. Beethoven began to lose his hearing at 26, and never married. He is said to have been the first important composer to make a decent living without subsidies from the court or church. He died on March 26, 1827.

  • Previous name: Avalon Avenue
  • Date of name change: February 17, 1982
  • First home constructed: 1982

Beland Road

This street is named for Jean Beland, who was a city councillor in Côte Saint-Luc from 1950 to 1958.

  • First home constructed: 1954

Bernard Mergler Crescent

This street is named for labour lawyer and civil rights activist Bernard Mergler. He was born on May 12, 1915. He studied law at the University of Montreal and became a member of the Bar of Quebec in 1936. He was a member of the Communist Party of Canada from 1936 to 1956. In the late 1940s, Mergler was a lawyer in the court case challenging the Quebec government's Act respecting Communistic Propaganda, which came to be called the Padlock Law. The law gave the Quebec Premier a free hand to suspend civil liberties. During the FLQ crisis of 1970, Mergler acted as a negotiator between the government and the kidnappers. He died on October 21, 1975.

  • First home constructed: 1998

Borden Avenue

This street is named for Sir Robert Laird Borden, who was Prime Minister of Canada from 1911 to 1920. Borden was born in Grand Pre, Nova Scotia on June 26, 1854. He was leader of the opposition in the House of Commons from 1901 to 1911. He served on the League of Nations Council after the First World War. In 1918, Borden's government extended voting rights to women. Borden died on June 10, 1937.

  • First home constructed: 1953

Brandeis Avenue

This street is named for Louis Dembitz Brandeis, who was the first Jewish United States Supreme Court Justice. Brandeis was born in Louisville, Kentucky on November 13, 1856. He earned his LL.B. degree from Harvard in 1877 and practiced law in Boston from 1879 to 1916. He earned the name "the people's counsel" because of the activities with which he involved himself at local and national levels concerning public interests. He was appointed to the Supreme Court in 1916. He retired from his judicial post in 1939 and died in 1941.

  • Previous name: Frederic Chopin
  • Date of change: February 17, 1982
  • First home constructed: 1981

Caldwell Avenue

This street is named for the American author Erskine Caldwell. He was born in Coweta County, Georgia on December 17, 1903. He attended but did not graduate from Erskine College. His first published book was called Bastard (1929), but he is famous for his books entitled Tobacco Road (1932) and God's Little Acre (1933). He was married to photographer Margaret Bourke-White from 1939 to 1942. During the Second World War, he traveled to Ukraine and documented the war effort there. A lifelong smoker, Caldwell died of a tobacco-related illness on April 11, 1987.

  • First home constructed: 1964

Cavendish Boulevard

The source of this name is unclear. The street is named for one of the following men: (1) Lord Frederick Charles Cavendish, who was a British statesman and protégé of William Ewart Gladstone. Cavendish was born on November 30, 1836 in Eastbourne, Sussex, England. He was murdered during the Irish crisis on May 6, 1882. (2) George Cavendish, who was an English courtier and writer. He was popular for the work he wrote about Cardinal Wolsey. Cavendish was born in 1500 and died about 1561 or 1962. (3) Henry Cavendish, who was an English physicist and chemist noted for his discovery of hydrogen. He was born on October 10, 1731 in Nice, France. He conducted experiments in diverse fields and discovered such phenomena as the composition of air, the nature and properties of hydrogen, specific heat of certain substances, the composition of water, and various properties of electricity. He is also known for his "Cavendish experiment", which measured the density and mass of the Earth. He died on February 24, 1810.

  • Previous name: King George Boulevard
  • Date of name change: January 1, 1969.
  • First home constructed: 1951

Centennial Avenue

This street is named for the Confederation centenary of 1967, which marked 100 years of federal union among the original Canadian provinces.

  • First home constructed: 1967

Chamberland Crescent

This street is named for the founding pastor of Saint Richard's Church, who was appointed in 1959.

  • First home constructed: 1962

Chopin Road

This street is named for the Polish pianist and composer, Frederic Chopin (Fryderyk [Franciszek] Chopin). Chopin was born in Zelazowa Wola, Poland on March 1, 1810 to a Polish mother and French-expatriate father. His early life was regarded as a child-prodigy pianist. He started his music career at an early age and by age 7 had written a Polonaise in G Minor. At age 16, Chopin was enrolled in the Warsaw Conservatory of Music. When he moved to Paris, France, he was a recitalist and teacher. He spent most of his time in Paris during his life, and never married but was involved with the writer George Sand (Amandine Aurore Lucile Dupin) for a few years. Chopin had poor health throughout his life and died on October 17, 1849.

  • Previous name: Oneida Road
  • Date of name change: February 17, 1982
  • First home constructed: 1985

Collins Road

This street is named for the American astronaut Michael Collins, who orbited the Moon while Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin performed the first manned landing on the lunar surface during the Apollo 11 mission. Collins was born in Rome, Italy on October 31, 1930. He graduated from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, New York and joined the space program in 1963. He was a test pilot in the Air Force and had been in space twice in his life. In 1969, Collins was appointed assistant secretary of state for public affairs. In 1971 he joined the administrative staff of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C.

  • Previous name: Beethoven Road
  • Date of change: October 6, 1969
  • First home constructed: 1985

Conklin Road

This street is named for H.E. Conklin, who was a Côte Saint-Luc city councillor from 1954 to 1957.

  • First home constructed: 1954

Côte Saint-Luc Road

The street is named for the city of the same name. The name can be divided into two parts. "Côte" stands for the hill that accessed Côteau Saint-Pierre from north-west. "Saint-Luc" refers to the evangelist Saint Luke, who was an artist, author of the Third Gospel of Acts in the New Testament, and a physician. He is the patron saint of physicians, surgeons, and the painting of pictures. It may also be the name of the owner who owned the land at the time it was named. The custom in the day was to use the land owner's name when naming towns or roads and to add "Saint" to the place name. So, if the name of the owner was Luc, the name of the land might be named Saint-Luc. The origin of the name had been around since the 1660s.

  • First home constructed: 1925

David Lewis Road

This street is named for Canadian lawyer and politician, David Lewis. Lewis was born in Russia on June 23, 1909. He was founder and national secretary of the Cooperative Commonwealth Federation (CCF) in Canada from 1936 to 1950. He was also one of the key architects of the New Democratic Party (NDP) and was the leader from 1971 to 1975. His politics were heavily influenced by the Jewish Labour Bund, which made him an advocate of parliamentary democracy. When he retired, he was named to the Order of Canada for his political service. On May 23, 1981 Lewis died after a long battle with cancer.

  • First home constructed: 1998

Davies Avenue

This street is named for A. Edgar Davies, who was a Côte Saint-Luc city councillor from 1949 to 1952.

  • Previous name: Fletcher Avenue
  • Date of name change: July 21, 1954
  • First home constructed: 1955

Edison Road

This street is named for the American inventor and physicist, Thomas Alva Edison, who developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Edison was born in Milan, Ohio on February 11, 1847. His first inventions, at age 15, were the transmitter and receiver for the automatic telegraph. In 1882, he installed the first central power station in New York City. His discovery of "thermionic emission" was the base for future electronic inventions in the 1900s. Edison is considered one of the most prolific inventors in history, holding 1,093 U.S. patents in his name, as well as many patents in the United Kingdom, France and Germany. Edison died on October 18, 1931.

  • First home constructed: 1966

Einstein Avenue

This street is named for the famous German-born theoretical physicist Albert Einstein. He is best known for his theory of relativity and specifically mass–energy equivalence, E = mc2. Einstein’s many contributions to physics include his special theory of relativity, which reconciled mechanics with electromagnetism, and his general theory of relativity, which extended the principle of relativity to non-uniform motion, creating a new theory of gravitation. Einstein was born on March 14, 1879 into a Jewish family in Ulm, Wurttemberg, Germany. He became professor of theoretical physics at the University of Zurich in 1909, and held the same position at the German University in Prague between 1911 and 1912. In 1913, he was elected to the Prussian Academy of Sciences in Berlin. Einstein won the Nobel Prize in Physics for 1921. Einstein served on the Board of Governors of The Hebrew University of Jerusalem. In his will of 1950, Einstein bequeathed literary rights to his writings to The Hebrew University, where many of his original documents are held in the Albert Einstein Archives. Einstein died an American citizen on April 18, 1955.

  • Former name: Frontenac Avenue
  • Date of name change: 1962
  • First home constructed: 1966

Elgin Avenue

This street is named for James Bruce, 8th Earl of Elgin and 12th Earl of Kincardine. Lord Elgin was the Governor General of the Province of Canada from 1847 to 1854. In 1848, the reformers of Canada East and Canada West, Louis-Hippolyte Lafontaine and Robert Baldwin, won their elections, and Lord Elgin asked them to form a government together. Lord Elgin granted responsible government and became the first Governor General to remove himself from the affairs of the legislature, leading to the essentially symbolic role that the Governor General now has. Elgin was born on July 20, 1811 in London, England. He studied at Eton and Oxford University, and entered the House of Commons in 1841. Between 1842 and 1846, he served as governor of Jamaica. After his position in Canada, Elgin served as a diplomat in Japan and China. In 1862, he was appointed viceroy and governor general of India. While still in office, Elgin passed away on November 20, 1863.

  • First home constructed: 1947

Emerald Avenue

  • Former name: Wavell Avenue
  • Date of name change: March 1960
  • First home constructed: 1960

Emerson Road

This street is named for the American writer and philosopher Ralph Waldo Emerson. Emerson was born in Boston on May 25, 1803. He attended the Boston Latin School and then Harvard College. Emerson returned to Harvard in 1825 to study divinity and was given a license to preach the following year. He had preached from various pulpits before being ordained pastor of the Second Unitarian Church in 1829. Emerson was a successful lecturer and helped to start the Transcendental Club in 1836. He was considered one of the great orators of the time. He is famous for his many essays and poems. Late in his life, he supported the abolition of slavery. Emerson died on April 27, 1882.

  • First home constructed: 1966

Euclid Road

This street is named for the Greek mathematician in the Hellenistic period. He was born around 300BC and had resided in Alexandria, Egypt. He is known for coming out with Euclid’s Elements, which was a math text book on the principles of geometry, the number theory and the proof of the infinitude of prime numbers. It is not clear when he died.

  • First home constructed: 1957

Freud Avenue

This street is named for Dr. Sigmund Freud, who was a physician and founder of psychoanalysis. Freud was born on May 6, 1856 in Freiberg, Moravia (Austrian Empire). Freudian theory had a great effect on psychology, psychiatry, and other fields. He studied at the University of Vienna in 1873 as a medical student and the General Hospital of Vienna in 1882. In 1885 he studied in Paris with neurologist Jean-Martin Charcot. It was during this time that Freud realized how mental disorders could be caused by psychological factors instead of organic brain disease. He developed theories about the mind, consciousness, the process of dream formation, and infantile sexuality. Freud passed away on September 23, 1939.

  • Previous name: Rustic Avenue
  • Date of name change: June 13, 1969

Heywood Road

This street is named for D.W. Heywood, who was a Côte Saint-Luc city councillor from 1932 to 1958. The street used to be part of Guelph Road before it became its own street on March 6, 1967.

  • First home constructed: 1965

Honoré de Balzac Avenue

This street is named for the French writer Honoré de Balzac, who was born in Tours, France on May 20, 1799. He was a nineteenth century novelist and playwright. Most of his novels were of a comedic nature and he is considered to be a founding father of realism in European literature. He was known to work up to 15 hours a day, and he produced many stories that were put together and called "La Comédie humaine". His health was starting to fail by 1847 and he died on August 18, 1850.

  • First home constructed: 1969

Hudson Avenue

The street is named for the English navigator and explorer Henry Hudson, who explored Canada in the sixteenth century. Hudson was born on September 12, 1550 in London, England. The Hudson Bay and the Hudson River are also both named after him. In 1609 he and his crew had approached Newfoundland, went to the coast of Maine, passed through Delaware River, went up to New Jersey and anchored in Lower New York Bay. He sailed on the Hudson River, going as far as Albany. His arrival to the Hudson Bay on November 1, 1610 proved fatal, as conspirators sent him and his two sons out on a boat in the water with no food or supplies, after the ship they had anchored with was frozen in and there was no more food left. It is estimated that Hudson died sometime after June 23, 1611.

  • First home constructed: 1920

Ilan Ramon Crescent

The street is named for Ilan Ramon, a fighter pilot in the Israeli Air Force and later the first Israeli astronaut. Ramon and six fellow astronauts died on February 1, 2003 when the Space Shuttle Columbia re-entered the atmosphere of the Earth. He was born on June 20, 1954 in Ramat Gan, Israel. In 1987, he received a bachelor’s degree in electronics and computer engineering from Tel-Aviv University in Israel. Ten years later, Ramon was designated to train as prime for a space shuttle mission with a payload that included a multi-spectral camera for recording desert aerosol (dust). He trained from 1998 until 2003 at the Johnson Space Center in Houston.

  • Previous name: Kipling Crescent
  • Date of name change: 2003
  • First home constructed: 2002

Irving Layton Avenue

The street is named for the Canadian poet, Irving Layton. Layton was born on March 12, 1912 in Targu Neamt, Romania. At age 1, his family came to Canada and settled in Montreal. Layton never received a high school diploma, but he later attended Macdonald College in 1934, and received a Bachelor of Science degree in agriculture in 1939. In 1946, Layton received an M.A. in economics and political science from McGill University. The publication of "A Red Carpet For The Sun" in 1959 secured Layton’s national reputation while the many books of poetry which followed eventually gave him an international reputation. Layton died on January 4, 2006.

  • First home constructed: 2006

Kellert Avenue

The street is named for a great benefactor of the Davis YMCA for many years.

  • First home constructed: 1974

King Edward Avenue

The street is named for King Edward VII of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. Albert Edward was born at Buckingham Palace on November 9, 1841. He was the successor and son of Queen Victoria and the initiator of the Anglo-French Entente Cordiale and the Anglo-Russian Alliance. This sovereign incorporated Côte Saint-Luc as a village on June 1, 1903. Before being crowned king, he was known as the Prince of Wales. In the first few months of 1859, he studied at the University of Edinburgh. He then became an undergraduate at Christ Church, Oxford. In 1861, he enrolled at Trinity College, Cambridge, but never graduated. He married Alexandra of Denmark on September 9, 1862. He became king on January 22, 1901, the day his mother died. King Edward died on May 5, 1910.

  • First home constructed: 1955

Kirwan Road

The street is named for Edward J. Kirwan, who was a Côte Saint-Luc city councillor from 1923 to 1973. Kirwan helped launch the Côte Saint-Luc police department in 1933 with himself as head. He was also fond of sports and promoted sports and other youth programs in the city.

  • First home constructed: 1955

Korczak Crescent

The street is named for Dr. Janus Korczak, who was a physician, writer and educator. Korczak was born as Henryk Goldsmit in Warsaw on July 22, 1878. He had helped poor and orphaned children all his life. He established an orphanage in 1912. Korczak also worked at a Polish radio station, was a principal of an experimental school, served as an expert witness in a district court for minors and received many awards. He was called the "Father of Orphans" and had perished on August 6, 1942 in the Treblinka camp, with the children he was taking care of.

  • First home constructed: 1976

Krieghoff Avenue

The street is named for painter Cornelius Krieghoff, who created many portraits of the Canadian landscape. He was one of the most famous Canadian painters of the nineteenth century. Krieghoff was born in Amsterdam on June 19, 1815, but moved to Canada in 1840. In 1871, he moved to Chicago and died there a year later on March 8, 1872.

  • Previous name: Elmview Avenue
  • Date of name change: February 17, 1982
  • First home constructed: 1983

Léger Avenue

The street is named for Joseph Raoul Henri Léger, who was a Côte Saint-Luc city councillor from 1939 to 1942. He died on October 2, 1980.

  • First home constructed: 1954

Lismer Avenue

The street is named for Arthur Lismer who was a Canadian painter. He was a member of the Group of Seven, a group of Canadian landscape painters in the 1920s. Lismer was born on June 27, 1885 in Sheffield, England. He died on March 23, 1969.

  • Previous name: Ashley Avenue
  • Date of name change: February 17, 1982

Louis Pasteur Road

The street is named for Louis Jean Pasteur who was a French scientist, chemist and biologist. He also invented pasteurization, which prevents milk and wine from going sour. Pasteur was born in Dole, France on December 27, 1822. He attended the École Normale Supérieure, and later became a professor of physics at Dijon Lycée in 1848. He is considered one of the three founders of bacteriology and he also came up with a vaccine for rabies. Pasteur died on September 28, 1895.

  • First home constructed: 1976

Luck Avenue

The street is named for Carl Luck, who was a Côte Saint-Luc city councillor from 1943 to 1947.

  • Previous name: Lamont Avenue
  • Date of name change: July 21, 1954
  • First home constructed: 1954

Mackle Road

The street is named for J. F. Mackle (of 14 St. John Street) who was the selling agent for what was called the C.P.R. Townsite Sortin in 1913. This included the first streets in the north-west section of Côte Saint-Luc: Palmer, Lemieux, and Smart. The cross streets were Mackle, Kildare, and Guelph.

  • First home constructed: TBD

Marc Chagall Avenue

The street is named for Marc Chagall, a Jewish artist who worked in several artistic media, including paintings, book illustrations, stained glass, stage sets, ceramics, tapestries and fine art prints. Chagall born on July 7, 1887 in Belarus. He started studying painting in 1906 and moved to St. Petersburg in 1907. He studied at Zvantseva's School from 1908 to 1910. He moved to Paris in 1923 and became a French citizen in 1937. He fled Paris with his family in 1941 as a result of the Nazi occupation. He moved to the United States, eventually returning to France in 1948. Chagall died in France on March 28, 1985.

  • First home constructed: 1988

McAlear Avenue

The street is named for Maurice E. McAlear, who was a Côte Saint-Luc city councillor from 1934 to 1941.

  • First home constructed: 1954

McCubbin Road

The street is named for Yvan McCubbin, who was a Côte Saint-Luc city councillor from 1934 to 1941.

  • Previous name: Winston Road
  • Date of name change: July 21, 1954
  • First home constructed: 1954

Montgomery Avenue

The street is named for Montgomery of Alamein and Hindhead, Bernard Law Montgomery, and 1st Viscount. He was a British field marshal and one of the principal Allied commanders of the Second World War. Montgomery was born on November 17, 1887 in London. He went to St. Paul's School in London and the Royal Military Academy in Sandhurst. During the First World War, he played a distinguished role by being in the army and then led a division in France during the Second World War. In August 1942, Winston Churchill appointed him commander of the British 8th Army in North Africa. He shared responsibility in the successful Allied invasion of Sicily in July 1943. Following the war, Montgomery was made a knight of the garter and was created a viscount in 1946. He died on March 24, 1976.

Mountbatten Road

The street is named for Mountbatten (of Burma), Louis Mountbatten, and 1st Earl. He was a British statesman, naval leader, and the last viceroy of India. He was born on June 25, 1900 in Windsor, England. He entered the Royal Navy in 1913 and became aide-de-camp to the Prince of Wales in 1921. When the Second World War started, he was appointed commander of an aircraft carrier in 1941. He successfully conducted the campaign against Japan that led to the recapture of Burma. He was created viscount in 1946 and Earl in 1947. Mountbatten was fourth sea lord from 1950 to 1952, commander in chief of the Mediterranean fleet from 1951 to 1954, and first sea lord from 1955 to 1959. He then became governor (1965), and later lord lieutenant (1974) of the Isle of Wight. He was killed on August 27, 1979 by a bomb planted on his boat.

  • First home constructed: 1956

Mozart Road

The street is named for Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, an Austrian composer of the Classical era. He is among the most enduringly popular of the classical composers. Mozart was born on January 27, 1756 in Salzburg. At age 3, he began to play instruments. By age 5, he had already written a musical composition. He composed more than 600 compositions, which were symphonic, concertante, chamber, piano, operatic, and choral music. He frequently caught fevers and did not have great health. Mozart died on December 5, 1791, with speculations about the cause of death.

  • Previous name: Rockley Road
  • Date of name change: February 17, 1982
  • First home constructed: 1985

Newton Road

The street is named for Sir Isaac Newton, who was an English physicist, mathematician, astronomer, natural philosopher, alchemist, and theologian. Newton was born on January 4, 1643 in Lincolnshire, England. He received a bachelor’s degree in 1665 from Trinity College, Cambridge. In 1669, he returned to the college as a Lucasian professor of mathematics. He laid the foundation of calculus, extended the understanding of color and light, and examined the mechanics of planetary motion. He also formulated three laws of mechanics, which led to the law of gravitation. He is considered to have had the greatest influence on the history of science. Newton was knighted in 1705 and died on March 31, 1727.

  • Previous name: D’Arcy McGee Avenue
  • Date of name change: July 17, 1969
  • First home constructed: 1984

Nice Road

The street is named for Mr. Nice, who was the Director of Public Works in the 1950s.

  • First home constructed: 1954

Rand Avenue

The street is named for Harry Rand, who was a city councillor of Côte Saint-Luc from 1950 to 1958.

  • First home constructed: 1954

Randall Avenue

The street is named for Samuel Jackson Randall, who was United States Senator and statesman. Randall was born on October 10, 1828 in Philadelphia. He served on the Philadelphia city council and in the state senate before joining the Union Army during the Civil War. In 1875, he became leader of the Democratic Party in Pennsylvania. He was Speaker of the House of Representatives from 1876 to 1881. He died on April 13, 1890.

  • Previous name: Fielding
  • Date of name change: TDB
  • First home constructed: 1927

Rembrandt Avenue

The street is named for Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn, who is considered one of the most famous painters and printmakers in European art history. He was born on July 15, 1606 in Leiden, the Netherlands. He has made more than 300 paintings, 400 etchings and over 2,000 drawings. He was also known to do many self-portraits, which were done throughout his life. His wife and son were featured frequently in the paintings along with mythical, biblical and historical themes. He died on October 4, 1669.

  • First home constructed: 1974

Robinson Avenue

The street is named for G. Harry Robinson, who was a Côte Saint-Luc city councillor from 1949 to 1953.

  • Previous name: Alexandra Avenue
  • Date of name change: July 21, 1954
  • First home constructed: 1952

Sabin Avenue

The street is named for Dr. Albert Bruce Sabin, who developed the polio vaccine in 1955. He was born on August 26, 1906 in Bialystok, Russia (now Poland) to Jewish parents, Jacob and Tillie Saperstein. In 1921, he and his family moved to the United States, becoming citizens in 1931. That year, he earned his medical degree from New York University. He trained at Bellevue Hospital in New York City from 1931 to 1933. With the menace of polio growing in the 1950s, Sabin worked to perfect an oral vaccine. He received the National Medal of Science in 1970 and the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1986. He died on March 3, 1993.

  • Previous name: Fletcher Avenue
  • Date of name change: July 17, 1969
  • First home constructed: 1975

Schweitzer Road

The street is named for Albert Schweitzer, who was a philosopher, pastor and physicist. Schweitzer was born on January 14, 1875 in Kaisersberg, Alsace-Lorraine—at the time in the German empire. After 1893, he went to study theology at the Kaiser Wilhelm Universität of Strasbourg. When he had published his memoir in 1899, he became pastor of the Saint-Nicolas church in Strasbourg. At age 30, he began his medical studies. He was a medical missionary in Africa. He found and sustained the Lambaréné Hospital in Gabon, and stayed there until 1948. From 1952 onward, he worked on nuclear tests and nuclear weapons. He received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1953. Schweitzer died on September 4, 1965.

  • First home constructed: 1968

Shalom Avenue

The street is named for the Hebrew word meaning peace, completeness, and welfare and can be used idiomatically to mean both hello and goodbye. Shalom is also common in modern Hebrew as a given name or a surname.

  • Previous name: Montcalm Avenue
  • Date of name change: 1956
  • First home constructed: 1979

Silverson Avenue

The street is named for Walter Silverson, who was a Côte Saint-Luc city councillor from 1952 to 1953.

  • Previous name: Regent Road
  • Date of name change: July 21, 1954
  • First home constructed: 1954

Sir Walter Scott Avenue

The street is named for Sir Walter Scott, a prolific Scottish historical novelist and poet popular throughout Europe during his time. He was born on August 15, 1771 in Edinburgh, Scotland. He is best known for his novels Ivanhoe and Rob Roy. In 1779 he attended the High School of Edinburgh, and started studying classics at the University of Edinburgh in 1783. By 1786, he was an apprentice in his father’s office. He decided that he wanted to become a lawyer, so returned to university and took courses from 1789. He was admitted to the Faculty of Advocates in 1792. He began taking writing seriously, by the time he was 25. Some time after 1819 he was granted the title of baronet. In 1825, he had begun experiencing financial woes and was failing in health by 1831. Scott died on September 21, 1832.

  • First home constructed: 1969

Sir Winston Churchill Avenue

The street is named for Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill, who served as Prime Minister for the United Kingdom from 1940 to 1945, and again from 1951 to 1955. Churchill was born on November 30, 1874 in Woodstock, Oxfordshire. In 1888 he went to Harrow school, which started his military career. When he left the school in 1893, he tried to get into the Royal Military College in Sandhurst. After three attempts, he was finally admitted and he graduated in 1894. He was immediately commissioned as a Second Lieutenant in the 4th Queen's Own Hussars in 1895. In 1941, he received the honour of Colonel of the Hussars. He had traveled to many places, including Cuba, Malakand, Sudan, South Africa and India. In 1908 he married and had five children. He suffered a stroke in 1953 and died on January 24, 1965.

  • First home constructed: 1974

Stephen Leacock Avenue

The street is named for the Canadian writer, economist and humorist. Leacock was born on December 30, 1869 in Hampshire, England. The family moved to Canada shortly after, and he was sent to the private school of Upper Canada College in Toronto. In 1887 he attended the University of Toronto and by 1899 he started graduate studies at the University of Chicago, where he obtained a doctorate in political science and political economy. He became a lecturer and head of the political economy department at McGill University in Montreal. In 1936 he was forced to retire by the McGill board of governors. He was awarded the Royal Society of Canada's Lorne Pierce Medal in 1937. In 1947, the Stephen Leacock Award was created to recognize the best in Canadian humorous literature. Leacock died on March 28, 1944 after suffering from throat cancer.

  • First home constructed: 1983

The Avenue

This street is named in recognition of its central location. It is an east-west road that passes through the Cavendish Mall redevelopment project. Its wide sidewalks, benches, and bicycle lanes make it a place to stroll, sit and meet friends.

  • First home constructed: 2013

Tommy Douglas Street

This street is named for Thomas Clement Douglas, who was a Canadian social democratic politician. Douglas was born on October 20, 1904 in Falkirk, Scotland. In 1910, his family came to Canada. He attended Brandon College to study ministry in 1924, and got his degree in 1930. He then received his master's degree in Sociology from McMaster University in 1933. He was elected to the Canadian House of Commons in the 1935 federal election. Douglas was the leader of the Saskatchewan Co-operative Commonwealth Federation in 1942 and the seventh premier of Saskatchewan from 1944 to 1961. He introduced universal public medicare in 1961. He was the first federal leader for the New Democratic Party from 1961 to 1971. He received an honorary Doctor of Laws in 1962, and again in 1980. He died on February. 24, 1986 from cancer.

  • First home constructed: 1988

Wallenberg Road

This street is named for after Raoul Gustav Wallenberg, who was a Swedish diplomat and who saved the lives of about 15,000 Hungarian Jews during the Holocaust. He was born on August 4, 1912 in Lidingo, Sweden. In 1931 he went to study architecture at the University of Michigan and then went back to Sweden, but could not find employment as an architect. Between 1935 and 1936 he worked in a minor position at one of the branches for a bank in Holland. In 1937, he became a joint owner and international director of the Central European Trading Company in Sweden. In 1944 Wallenberg was chosen by the Office of Strategic Services to lend the War Refugee Board's support to the saving of Hungarian Jews in Budapest. He vanished at the age of 32 on July 16, 1947. There are speculations about his death.

  • Previous name: Whitfield Road
  • Date of name change: February 17, 1982
  • First home constructed: 1981

Wavell Road

This street is named for Sir Archibald Wavell, who was a British intellectual, diplomat and military leader. He was born on May 5, 1883 in Essex, England. After World War I, he became commander in chief for the Middle East in 1939. He had destroyed the Italian armies in North Africa at the peak of his career in 1940. He led troops into battle in the 1941 Campaign in Africa during World War II. He could not however withstand German forces of Greece and Crete, nor of North Africa later that year, and was replaced. In 1943 he was promoted to field marshal and appointed viceroy of India till 1947. That same year he was created an earl. Wavell died on May 24, 1950.

  • First home constructed: 1952

Weizmann Road

This street is named for the first president of the state of Israel, Chaim Azriel Weizmann. He was born on November 27, 1874 in Motol, Russia. He was educated in Germany and Switzerland. He was a chemist and taught chemistry at Manchester University in England from 1904 to 1914. During the First World War, he discovered a better way of making acetone and butyl alcohol for explosives, which helped Britain’s war effort. He also founded the Daniel Sieff Research Institute in 1934, which changed its name to the Weizmann Institute of Science in 1949. Between 1920 and 1930 and again from 1935 to 1946 he was president of the World Zionist Organization. Weizmann was president of Israel from 1949 until his death. He died on November 9, 1952.

  • First home constructed: 1969

Wentworth Avenue

This street is named for Sir John Wentworth, who was office holder and colonial administrator. He was born on August 9, 1737 in Portsmouth, New Hampshire. He obtained his BA from Harvard College in 1755 and then his MA in 1758. In 1766, he was chosen to succeed his uncle's office as governor of New Hampshire. He was created a baronet in 1795. Despite his position he did have financial troubles and had run-ins with his creditors, many of which he tried to escape. He moved to Nova Scotia in 1812, so that he could receive the salary of a surveyor general. In 1816, he suffered a stroke, which left him quite incapacitated. Wentworth died on April 8, 1820.

  • First home constructed: 1954

Westover Road

This street is named for Oscar M. Westover, successor of Foulois, who was chief of the Air Corps. He held position of chief from 1935 to 1938. He was born in Bay City, Michigan, 1883. He began military service in 1901 when he enlisted in the U.S. Army. He graduated in 1906 and was commissioned as second lieutenant in the infantry. He became first lieutenant in 1911, captain in 1916, and major on October 20, 1917. He attended the Air Service Balloon School in 1921, and went to four more Air schools within the next 11 years. Originally, he was a balloonist and specialized as an airship pilot, airplane pilot and airplane observer. Westover had been awarded the Distinguished Service Medal and the World War I Victory Medal. He was killed in a plane crash, when coming in for a landing on September 21, 1938.

  • First home constructed: TBD

Wolseley Avenue

This street is named for General Garnet Joseph Wolseley, who was a British army officer. It was given this name in the early years of the twentieth century. Wolseley was born on June 4, 1833 at Golden Bridge, County Dublin. He served Burma, the Crimean War, the Indian Mutiny, China, Canada, and widely throughout Africa. There were many times he was severely wounded, and in 1855 he lost sight in his right eye. He married in 1867 and had one child. He was a commander of the troops in Ireland from 1890 to 1894, and commander-in-chief of Britain forces from 1895 to 1902. He received many awards and medals throughout his life, including the war medal with clasp, the 5th class of the French Légion d'honneur, the 5th class of the Turkish Mejidie and the Turkish medal. Wolseley died on March 25, 1913.

  • First home constructed: 1955

Yad Mordechai Place

This street is named for Mordecai Anielewicz, who was the commander of the Warsaw Ghetto uprising and of the Jewish Fighting Organization. It was named on September 26, 1993. Anielewicz was born in 1919 in Wyszków near Warsaw. After he graduated from High School he joined the Zionist-socialist youth movement, known as Hashomer Hatzair. In 1939, he escaped to the eastern regions but was thrown into jail when he tried crossing the Romanian border. He returned to Warsaw in 1940, where he organized cells and youngsters groups, instructed, participated in underground publications, organized meetings and seminars and visited other groups in different cities. The Warsaw ghetto uprising commenced on April 19, 1943. Anielewicz committed suicide with his girlfriend on May 8, 1943 after realizing that their capture would be inevitable.

  • First home constructed: 1999

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Parkhaven Avenue

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Pinedale Avenue

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Westbrooke Avenue

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